Boston Opera Singer 1

fallback-no-image-6880
ToolBox

4,962 Views

9 Comments

Print this page

Add Favorites

Boston Opera Singer 1

Acclaimed for her beautiful clarion tone, power and natural musicianship, this Boston Opera Singer is regarded as one of the most versatile sopranos performing today. That versatility has allowed her opportunities with some of todays most celebrated institutions and musicians including; a solo role in Peer Gynt with the New York Philharmonic under Kurt Masur, a theatrical version of the St. Matthew Passion at the Brooklyn Academy of Music directed by Jonathan Miller, a tour of Venice with DiCapo Opera and the Fairfield Chorale as soloist under conductor Johannes Somary, and opera arias with the Jenaer Philharmonic in Weimar, Germany.

She also performed live at the Knitting Factory for a Leonard Cohen tribute (NYC) in 2004. This Boston Opera Singer has sung the roles of Pamina in The Magic Flute, Belinda from Dido and Aeneas, Gretel from Hansel and Gretel, Violetta from La Traviata, and Lucy from The Telephone, among others. She was a finalist in the MacAllister Awards national operatic competition, and has received awards and honors from the Bethlehem Bach Festival, Connecticut Opera and the Carmel Bach Festival.

As a chorister this singer has had the opportunity to perform alongside the Mark Morris Dance Company, to premiere Michael Torke's "Four Seasons" with the New York Philharmonic, and to tour France, Korea and Taiwan with the acclaimed Westminster Choir under Joseph Flummerfelt. She also participated in Marlboro Music Festivals with the Blanche Moyse Chorale.

An active performer in the Northeastern United States, this Boston Opera Singer's most recent appearances include Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony with the Chappaqua Orchestra, Varese chamber songs at Columbia University with Alarm Will Sound, and Orff’s Carmina Burana with the Connecticut Master Chorale.

She was asked by the Charles Ives society to record “Borrowed” Tunes. She has also recorded popular music for Dreamcatcher Studios and Bright Lights music, and has made appearances on Channel 3’s “Better Connecticut” morning television show with Scot Haney.

This Boston Opera Singer completed a Master of Music in Vocal Pedagogy and Performance from Westminster Choir College, and earned a Bachelor of Music in Music Education from Keene State College.

Related Listings

Country United States
City Boston
State/Province Massachusetts
Category

9 responses to “Boston Opera Singer 1”

  1. Gilbert says:

    “[This Soprano] sang an especially warm and appealing In Trutina.”
    – Gilbert Mott, NewsTimes.com review entitled “Familiar music expertly performed,” for Carmina Burana with Connecticut Master Chorale, 2008

  2. Jim says:

    “Uplifting concert by the Connecticut Master Chorale! [This singer] proved exceptional in strength and tone …with a full and golden voice, sang the quieter and more contrasting sections. It was about as good as any choral concert can get.”
    – Jim Pegolotti, News-Times, 2004

  3. Jean says:

    “The soloists were fine, contributing impressive credentials, admirable technique and brilliant sound. Soprano … bright, full bel canto seemed a surprise from such a small body.”
    – Jean Gogolin, Rindge Paper, for The Messiah with the Monadnock Chorus, 2004

  4. Jim says:

    “The best part was when the two together completed an ‘I can do anything better than you’ duet. [This singer] and Kaplan’s voices contrasted beautifully during these vocal fireworks, as exciting and beautiful as only Mozart could have made it.”
    – Jim Lowe, Rutland Herald covering Opera Theatre of Weston, 2006

  5. Jan says:

    “Soprano soloist […] had a clear and pleasant voice that rose above the Chorale and Orchestra, somehow able to sing both with and apart from all of them.”
    – Jan Stribula, NewsTimeLive.com, 2007

  6. John says:

    “The musicians of Alarm Will Sound under the guidance of their superb musical director and conductor Alan Pierson, captured the underlying currents of Varese’s compositions with a superlative sense of control, dynamic and expert phrasing…Un grand sommeil noir from 1906 was affectingly sung by [This singer], accompanied by John Orfe on piano.”
    – John Hammel, Classical New Jersey Society Online, 2007

  7. Ned says:

    “[This singer] shone. Her technique allowed her to float on a glorious high note and then turn up to an even higher embellishment without strain or forcing or losing the very musical line. She showed a strong concept of the text and music of each of her airs, which she communicated beautifully. Brava!”
    – Ned Dahl, Monadnock Ledger, 2004

  8. Tony says:

    “[This singer], a pert boyish Oscar, offered clarion tone in her two showpiece arias and a soaring top in the great Act I ensemble.”
    – Tony Angarano, The Hartford Courant, reviewing Un Ballo in Maschera by Connecticut Concert Opera, 2002

  9. Jim says:

    “It was soprano […] who exhibited a voice of special purity and power.”
    – Jim Pegolotti, NewsTimeLive.com, 2006

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


4 + 3 =